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KPSEA Results; Why Public Schools may take the Lead in KPSEA 

KPSEA Results; Why Public Schools may take the Lead in KPSEA 
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KPSEA Results; Why Public Schools may take the Lead in KPSEA

KPSEA Results; Why Public Schools may take the Lead in KPSEA  

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KPSEA Results; a reasearch conducted by the Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development, KICD has revealed startling statistics that may determine the possible outcome(KNEC results) of the just concluded KPSEA national examinations for over 1.2 million grade 6 learners.

According to the KICD boss Professor Charles Ong’ondo, KICD conducted a study which revealed that public schools are seriously implementing practical and creative activities as opposed to their counter-parts in private primary schools.

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“Public schools have done well in this, you’ve ensured learners experience practicals and creative activities. Even though we are accused of asking learners to come with chicken, this has helped in learning. Our research shows public schools have ensured a lot of practicals,” noted KICD director Professor Ong’ondo.

Speaking during the Kenya Primary Schools Head Teachers Association meeting at the Sheikh Khalifa Bin Zayed Primary School in Mombasa, the KICD boss urged the more than 10,000 school managers to ensure learning is interesting, and that learners collaborate and engage in practicals.

Prof Ong’ondo supported the move by the state to domicile junior secondary school in primary learning institutions, saying the transition will be beneficial to the learners.

“Because you have known these children for six years, they are aged 12 to 15, transiting at a very critical stage of their lives. You will be able to guide them. You are the best people to transit these learners physically. When they break their voice you will guide them, you are the midwives as they transition from socialization to exploration,” said the KICD director.

He urged the teachers to take care of the pupils’ emotional development.

“Some of them did not even know they were doing KPSEA. So you have to explain to them. Last week, in one of the schools, two children began crying due to a mix-up in their (exam) sheets. Their teacher had to be called — not even the invigilator — to talk to them,” said Prof Ong’ondo.

The institute advises the government on curriculum matters, develops curriculum for all levels of education except universities, and evaluates all curriculum support materials.

“I see a number of our partners here who are publishers, with their publications. Headteachers, any time publications come to your institutions, always ask whether they have been approved by KICD because we serve as gatekeepers to ensure the materials have been checked for their relevance, access and utility values to the learners,” said Prof Ong’ondo.

He urged teachers to ensure learning is interesting and learners do not feel tortured, forced and unhappy while in school.

Book publishers have called for a robust public education on parental involvement in the learning of their children as the Competency Based Curriculum (CBC) continues to be rolled out in the country.

Publishers have also called for a robust public education on parental involvement in the learning of their children as the Competency Based Curriculum (CBC) continues to be rolled out in the country.

he Kenya Publishers Association (KPA) Chairman Kiarie Kamau, who is also the East African Educational Publishers CEO, yesterday said engaging parents in the CBC learning will help them to understand and appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of their children.

The publishers also called for intensive teacher training programmes on CBC to be implemented to enable teachers to interpret the curriculum designs correctly.

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